Turkish Islamic Arts
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Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts Istanbul

 This fascinating palace which is located in ancient Hippodrome of Constantinople was built in the 16 the century for Ibrahim Pasa, the grand vizier of Suleyman the Magnificent. The museum collections start with early Islamic ceramics from Samarra where Turks established one of their first settlements after central Asia. Few carvings and tombstones of Seljuk period gives excellent idea about the Art of Seljuks and their history. The reliefs containing human and animal images indicate the great tolerance of Seljuk Turks for images. One of the small rooms contains star shaped tiles from Great Seljuk period. Museum continues with the artifacts dating to early Ottoman Period. Tiles, Korans, textiles decorate the showing cases of the museum. 

A noteworthy collection of praying rugs in the elongated hall attracts visitors attention. These rugs with specific designs (mainly praying rugs) are known as Transylvanian rugs which had been sent as present or sold to these countries starting from the time of Suleyman the Magnificent. The sultan, at the beginning, sent 1000 rugs as present to the Hungarian churches. These attractive pieces drew so much attention that many other rugs were bought for the churches and Hungarian churches. As a result of a recent research, experts understood that the origin of these rugs were from Ottoman soil. Most of these so called Transylvanian Rugs are small size prayer rugs with unrivalled beauty. one can mention especially the rugs with Bellini pattern. 

Towards the end of the hall two carpets with the image of Holy Kaaba draw our attention. These Prayer rugs show the most Holy shine for the Muslim people.

 

 

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